There's a rabbi hinding under that bush!

Discussion in 'Attention Seekers' started by Karlijn, Jun 9, 2018.

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  1. Karlijn

    Karlijn Guest

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    Always fun when your mum mixes up English and Dutch. We were are the park earlier today, when my mum saw a rabbit. She wanted to point it out to us, but somehow mixed up the English word rabbit and the Dutch equivalent konijn, and ended up saying "er zit een rabbijn onder die struik", which literally means "there's a rabbi hiding under that bush. She head no idea why my dad and I burst out laughing.
     
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  2. Lucian Hodoboc

    Lucian Hodoboc Member

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    It was probably hiding from the imam who wanted to kill him.
     
  3. tool

    tool Addict

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    Oy vey!
     
  4. Mak1442

    Mak1442 Regular

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    Is Dutch language German?
     
  5. Karlijn

    Karlijn Guest

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    Dutch is a Germanic language, just like Norse, Swedish, Danish, English, Frisian and a couple of other lesser known languages
     
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  6. imakehersay

    imakehersay Member

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    Yeah, I feel like I am really close to understanding it. It reminds me of reading older English
     
  7. Karlijn

    Karlijn Guest

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    That is right. Old English, the language that was spoken in (parts of) England and southern Scotland, was closely related to Old Saxon and Old Frisian, which were the languages that were spoken in most of what is now the Netherlands. Middle and Modern English just sound very different thanks to William the Conqueror and his Norman followers.
     
  8. izbestbro

    izbestbro Veteran

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    Apparently it's pretty rough to learn. I have friend that moved to Amsterdam 4 years ago and he's still having a rough go with it haha. Smart guy too.
     
  9. Karlijn

    Karlijn Guest

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    It doesn’t help that most people here speak English and are more than willing to help
     
  10. CoralFang**

    CoralFang** suxbigbutthole

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    That's so cool, I didn't know English came from German. I feel so much more cultured now
     
  11. Karlijn

    Karlijn Guest

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    Not like that. Old English comes from the language(s) spoken by the Angles and Saxons, who lived in what is now Denmark and parts of what is now northern Germany and the Netherlands. So English doesn’t come from German, but English and German (and Frisian) come from the same roots
     
  12. CoralFang**

    CoralFang** suxbigbutthole

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    oooooooooooooooohhhhhhh okay. I think I understand now. Thank you
     
  13. Karlijn

    Karlijn Guest

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    Damn, I went full nerd there
     
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